Archive for the News Category

EAP at OAH in Atlanta, April 10-13

Friday, March 7th, 2014 | Permalink

If you’re heading down to Atlanta for the Organization of American Historians annual meeting in April, be sure to stop by booth 227. This year we will have an entire booth devoted to the series, and all of the EAP titles that have been published so far will be available to review or purchase. Representatives from participating presses will be on hand to answer questions as well. You can also pick up a copy of the latest EAP catalog and find out more about how to submit to the series.

 

EAP at AHA

Friday, December 14th, 2012 | Permalink

Editors from all four presses participating in the Early American Places series will be at the American Historical Association meeting in New Orleans.

If you’ll be at AHA and have a first book project in early American history that focuses on any of the following areas, please contact an EAP editor:

  • the southeastern colonies, the plantation economies of the Caribbean, and the Spanish borderlands (University of Georgia Press)
  • the Northeastern and Middle Atlantic colonies, and French and British Canada (New York University Press)
  • the old Northwest (Northern Illinois University Press)
  • the American far West (University of  Nebraska Press)

 

Interview with Robert Paulett about his new book, An Empire of Small Places

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012 | Permalink

Britain’s colonial empire in southeastern North America relied on the cultivation and maintenance of economic and political ties with the numerous powerful Indian confederacies of the region. Those ties in turn relied on British traders adapting to Indian ideas of landscape and power. In An Empire of Small Places, Robert Paulett examines this interaction over the course of the eighteenth century, drawing attention to the ways that conceptions of space competed, overlapped, and changed. He encourages us to understand the early American South as a landscape made by interactions among American Indians, European Americans, and enslaved African American laborers.

This is the fourth video featuring EAP authors. In each video, the authors are asked three questions:

1) Why did you focus your research on this particular place/area/region?

2) Please tell us a little more about your book.

3) Is your study specific to your area or is it applicable to other places/area/regions?

Interview with Kenneth H. Wheeler about his book, Cultivating Regionalism

Thursday, April 5th, 2012 | Permalink

In Cultivating Regionalism, Kenneth H. Wheeler revises our understanding of the nineteenth-century American Midwest by reconsidering an institution that was pivotal in its making — the small college. During the antebellum decades, Americans built a remarkable number of colleges in the Midwest that would help cultivate their regional identity. Through higher education, the values of people living north and west of the Ohio River formed the basis of a new Midwestern culture.

This is the third video featuring EAP authors. In each video, the authors are asked three questions:

1) Why did you focus your research on this particular place/area/region?

2) Please tell us a little more about your book.

3) Is your study specific to your area or is it applicable to other places/area/regions?

Early American Places on Facebook

Wednesday, April 4th, 2012 | Permalink

Early American Places now has a Facebook page. Please check us out, “like” us, and recommend us to friends!

Interview with Michele Reid-Vazquez about her book, The Year of the Lash

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012 | Permalink

The Year of the Lash reveals the untold story of the strategies of negotiation used by free blacks in the aftermath of the “Year of the Lash”—a wave of repression in Cuba during the mid-1800s that had great implications for the Atlantic World for two decades. Drawing on archival material from Cuba, Mexico, Spain, and the United States, Michele Reid-Vazquez provides a critical window into understanding how free people of color challenged colonial policies of terror and pursued justice on their own terms using formal and extralegal methods.

This is the second video featuring EAP authors. In each video, the authors are asked three questions:

1) Why did you focus your research on this particular place/area/region?

2) Please tell us a little more about your book.

3) Is your study specific to your area or is it applicable to other places/area/regions?

Interview with Diane Mutti Burke about her book, On Slavery’s Border

Tuesday, February 28th, 2012 | Permalink

On Slavery’s Border is a bottom-up examination of how slavery and slaveholding were influenced by both the geography and the scale of the slaveholding enterprise. Diane Mutti Burke focuses on the Missouri counties located along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers to investigate small-scale slavery at the level of the household and neighborhood.

This interview with Diane Mutti Burke is the first in a series of videos with EAP authors. In each video, the authors are asked three questions:

1) Why did you focus your research on this particular place/area/region?

2) Please tell us a little more about your book.

3) Is your study specific to your area or is it applicable to other places/area/regions?

Stay tuned for our next video which will feature Michele Reid-Vazquez talking about her book, The Year of the Lash.

First Book Now Available

Monday, November 1st, 2010 | Permalink

The first book in the Early American Places series is now available.

On Slavery’s Border: Missouri’s Small Slaveholding Households, 1815-1865
by Diane Mutti Burke

Published December 2010
University of Georgia Press
Buy at UGA Press

Mutti Burke_FNLOn Slavery’s Border tackles two important and understudied subjects: the history of slavery in the South’s border states, and the nature of small-scale slavery. It is full of original and interesting and useful insight about many topics—from the forced and voluntary migrations that created Missouri’s patterns of slavery, to white gender ideologies that resembled those of the midwestern farming communities to the north and east, to the labor, leisure, and familial interactions that shaped the material and affective worlds of whites and African Americans. I am very enthusiastic about On Slavery’s Border, and expect that its audience will include historians of slavery and of the South; historians specializing in African American history, family history, and the study of women, gender and sexuality; and of course both scholarly and popular readers interested in Missouri history.”–Leslie A. Schwalm, author of Emancipation’s Diaspora: Race and Reconstruction in the Upper Midwest

Announcing Early American Places

Monday, May 11th, 2009 | Permalink

The University of Georgia Press, New York University Press, and Northern Illinois University Press announce a collaborative book series supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Early American Places focuses on the history of North America from contact to the Mexican War, locating historical developments in the specific places where they occurred and were contested. Though these developments often involved far-flung parts of the world, they were experienced in particular communities—the local places where people lived, worked, and made sense of their changing worlds. By restricting its focus to smaller geographic scales, but stressing that towns, colonies, and regions were part of much larger networks, Early American Places will combine up-to-date scholarly sophistication with an emphasis on local particularities and trajectories. Books in the series will be exclusively revised dissertations.

The collaborating presses’ responsibilities are divided geographically. Georgia will focus on the southeastern colonies, the plantation economies of the Caribbean, and the Spanish borderlands. NYU will cover the northeastern and middle Atlantic colonies, and French and British Canada. Northern Illinois will cover the Great Lakes, the Upper Mississippi Valley, and the Great Plains.

Series advisory board:

Vincent Brown, Harvard University
Stephanie M. H. Camp, Rice University
Andrew Cayton, Miami University
Cornelia Hughes Dayton, University of Connecticut
Nicole Eustace, New York University
Amy S. Greenberg, Pennsylvania State University
Ramón A. Gutiérrez, University of Chicago
Peter Charles Hoffer, University of Georgia
Karen Ordahl Kupperman, New York University
Joshua Piker, University of Oklahoma
Mark M. Smith, University of South Carolina
Rosemarie Zagarri, George Mason University

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"The Early American Places series is an exciting development in scholarly publishing, one that will highlight the most important part of the study of history: the local and particular dimensions of global issues and trends. This is where the rubber meets the road, where ordinary people's lives help to make, and are made by, the bustling wider world in which they live. Early American Places is an original series, and it will publish important scholarship."

— Stephanie M. H. Camp, Rice University